Miro

Miro Internet TV Blog - Archive for January, 2009


Miro 2.0 Release Candidate

Friday, January 30th, 2009

The new Miro is almost ready— we’ve just posted a Release Candidate for Miro 2.0. That means it’s close to what we think will be the final version but we want some help making sure we haven’t missed any serious bugs.

Download Miro 2.0 RC1 — Download for Windows — Download for Mac — Download Source

There’s lots of new features and a brand new interface— try it out and let us know if you see anything wrong.

As Dean mentioned last week, we need more volunteers to help with translating and testing. Here’s how you can get involved:

Translating Miro: As many of you know, Miro and the Miro Guide are 100% volunteer translated. If you know any non-English languages, then we’d love to have you translate and/or refine the existing translations. Instructions for helping translate >>

Testing Miro: Using the latest pre-release version of Miro is really fun — and if you’ve got some time to help us run a few tests, we’d be really happy. Testing Steps:

  1. Download the pre-release version of Miro 2.0 (Windows, Mac, Linux).
  2. (optional) Back up your Miro database… better safe than sorry.
  3. Install your pre-release.
  4. Help us run Litmus tests. Janet has an easy to follow guide for testing with Litmus.

Thanks!

Note: there is an issue with YouTube downloads on every version of Miro. It should be fixed for RC2.


YouTube Download Issue

Friday, January 30th, 2009

YouTube seems to have changed their back end again, so downloads might not be working. We should have this fixed in the next day or so for the 2.0 branch and will put some download links up when it’s ready.

For Miro 1.2.8 users, you’re going to need to update to 2.0 to get this fix — sorry for the wait.

This might be the excuse we need to flesh out the plugin system we’ve been wanting to build. Then we could keep users updated without needing to re-release the entire application (and anyone else could build add-ons too, which would be amazing).


Miro 2.0 Pre-Launch Testing & Translating: Join Us!

Wednesday, January 21st, 2009

Our developers have been hard at work, and the results are pretty spectacular. The new Miro is faster, looks beautiful, and has lots of new tricks up its sleeve (one of my favorites is downloading HD from YouTube).

Before we launch we need some help with testing and translation — the more eyeballs we have, the faster we can push Miro 2.0 out the door. Salivate over this screenshot for a sec, and then try it out yourself.

Download links, translating how-to, and testing instructions are below.

mac-feed-thumb

Translating Miro: As many of you know, Miro and the Miro Guide are 100% volunteer translated. If you know any non-English languages, then we’d love to have you translate and/or refine the existing translations. Instructions for helping translate >>

Testing Miro: Using the latest pre-release version of Miro is really fun — and if you’ve got some time to help us run a few tests, we’d be really happy. Testing Steps:

  1. Download a pre-release version of Miro 2.0 (in this case the RC).
  2. (optional) Back up your Miro database… better safe than sorry.
  3. Install your pre-release.
  4. Help us run Litmus tests. Janet has an easy to follow guide for testing with Litmus.

Thanks! We really can’t say enough good stuff about the thousands of people who help: test, report bugs, translate, submit patches, moderate, and answer questions on GetSatisfaction. Thank you all!!!


YouTube To Add Video Download Links?

Friday, January 16th, 2009

Check out the bottom left side of the image…

Some of the new Obama YouTube videos have download links, which is a fantastic development. Lessig reports that this sort of linking may begin happening with other videos too.

click2download.JPG

It may be too soon for download links on every video, but I personally know a lot of video makers who would like to make their YouTube videos downloadable (they actually prefer being seen by as many people as possible). Let’s hope they make this option available to everyday users like you and I.

Could the Principles of Open Transition have had anything to do with this surprise feature?

I’ve always got to temper a super enthusiastic YouTube post by saying that they still have a long ways to go. Just today, Kevin Driscoll, MIT graduate student, cultural maven, and media activist had a disappointing exchange with the video giant over some DMCA counter-notifications.




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